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What is Live Alaska?

For those who know Alaska, it is no surprise that nearly every other reality tv show takes place in the state. The natural beauty, authenticity of the people, the adventure and the peaceful life come together to make Alaska a place to realize dreams. The Kenai Peninsula boasts active communities, spectacular views, and a wealth of recreational activities making it the perfect marriage of all the things Alaska has to offer.

There are three types of Alaskans who are shopping for real property: The Year Round Resident, the Recreational Owner and the Retiree.  Alaska's Kenai Peninsula's real estate offers abound for each of these markets. If you fall into one, or more, of these categories, we look forward to helping make your realty dreams, REALITY!

Year round     Recreation     RETIREMENT

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Live Alaska Year Round

HOMER

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Known as the "Cosmic Hamlet by the Sea," Homer is full of art, culture, and year round activities. People come to Homer for variety of reasons, and never leave. One thing all year round Homerites have in common is a love of adventure, the outdoors, wildlife, fresh air, creativity and authenticity. A recent Huffington Post article ranked Homer #1 in 8 Quirky Spots Where You're Free To Be You And Me.
Homer has been called the Halibut capital of the world. The 4.5 mile spit draws throngs of tourists each year, as well as supports seasonal work. Fishing, toursim, and oilfield work, combined with a wide range of entrpenuers comprise the workforce of the just over 5,000 year round residents. In the winter months the community still is bustling with community events and school activities.
If you are raising a family, there are few better places to raise healthy, independent, capable, community oriented, well-educated children.
The community offers many enrichment opportunities:
 
Alaska Islands & Ocean Visitor Center  - http://islandsandoceans.org/
Homer Little League - http://www.homerlittleleague.org/
Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies - http://www.akcoastalstudies.org
 
The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District provides primary and secondary education to the community of Homer. These schools are:
  • Homer High School (9-12)
  • Homer Flex High School (9-12)
  • Homer Middle School (7-8)
  • West Homer Elementary (3-6)
  • Paul Banks Elementary (K-2)
  • McNeil Canyon Elementary (K-6)
  • Fireweed Academy (K-6)
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There are also a host of great places to eat, drink and be festive. Visit the Homer Chamber of Commerce Site for information on Homer Businesses, Restaurants, and more!

 

ANCHOR POINT

Why Choose Anchor Point?

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Anchor Point is as desirable a geographical location for harmonious human and wildlife habitation today as it was in the late 1700’s when Captain Cook saw the fires of Denaina villages on the beach near the mouth of the Anchor River, or in the late 1800’s when miners sought the glitter of gold at the same location, or in the 1940’s when hardy homesteaders landed on that beach to stake out and patent 160 acre parcels that would become the now thriving community of Anchor Point. 

The prolific runs of Salmon, Steelhead, and Dolly Varden in the river, nearby Razor Clam beaches, and the abundance of Halibut and migrating Salmon in the salt water of Cook Inlet are still the primary draw to this rural community.

The social fabric of the community is made up of several churches, an active Chamber of Commerce, an excellent K-8 school, a vibrant Senior organization and facility, a community library, the VFW post.Critical community services include trained EMT and Fire volunteers and facility, Post Office, State Trooper headquarters, Health clinic, Dental office, public water, and the boat launch.

Other desirable amenities include a 9 hole golf course, private airpark, grocery market, package store, hardware store, mini-storage, restaurants, lodging, competent contractors,  a skilled workforce, real estate and accounting professionals, and many home based entrepreneurs. Gravel, gas, property and sales taxes are cheaper here.

The retirement and second home market is strong and growing, as well as the young-family first- home segment, and for the same reasons, proximity to sea and rivers and the back country of the Caribou Hills, and a short drive to Homer and the Bay.

This is truly the “Gold Coast” of Southcentral Alaska. We invite visitors and neighbors to “Come to play, come to stay”.

  • World class salmon and steelhead fishing on the river.
  • Boat launch access to the salt water for salmon and Halibut.
  • State maintained recreational areas and beach access.
  • New Fireweed golf course, and private airstrip.
  • Senior Center, Library, Churches, VFW, Chamber of Commerce.
  • Restaurants, cheaper gas and sales tax, well stocked hardware store.
  • Excellent K-8 school, Trooper Headquarters, Fire Station and EMS, Medical Clinic, and Dentist
  • Close access for skiing and snowmachining, and motocross track.
  • Growing artist community.
  • Competent Building Contractors, Auto Mechanics, and Tradesmen.
  • 20 minutes to Homer or Ninilchik, and 60 minutes to Kenai River and retailers.
  • Community friendly to newcomers, young couples, families, retirees.
  • Great place to raise kids.
    AnchorPointAKHP 

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Live Alaska Recreation

It is common for visitors to become seasonal residents. The fishing, site-seeing, beachcombing, hiking, skiing, snowboarding, and wilderness can prove to be more of a draw than a two week visit will fulfill. As a recreational resident you have so much to enjoy on the Kenai Peninsula.

HOMER

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Scattered throughout the commercial district are a wide range of restaurants and numerous art galleries. Few small towns have the culinary variety of Homer, where there are coffee bars on nearly every corner next to gourmet sandwich shops and fine restaurants. The art galleries along with museums, a live theater and music venues lend credence to Homer’s reputation as the cultural capital of Southcentral Alaska.

On the other side of the bay from Homer is Kachemak Bay State Wilderness Park, a 350,000-acre paradise of glaciers, mountains, protected coves for paddling and an extensive trail system to explore on foot. Kayakers, backpackers and campers hop on water taxis and to escape the bustle of Homer to an idyllic wilderness.
 

The Homer Spit, a 4.5-mile long needle of land stretching halfway across Kachemak Bay, is a hub of bustling activity during the summer. It hums with throngs of tourists, people camping on the beach, charter boats heading out to catch a record-breaking halibut, beachcombers, and birders amazed at how many bald eagles they can spot. This is where visitors book a fishing charter or simply rent a rod and reel to try their luck at the Homer Spit lagoon, fondly known as the Fishing Hole. King salmon can be caught here from mid-May to the end of June, while silver salmon run in August.

For more about Homer's Recreational Activities, visit the Homer Alaska Visitor's Guide. 
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ANCHOR POINTfly fishing2   

Visitors to Anchor Point will find a selection of lodging, restaurants, grocery stores, a tackle shop, an antique shop, an art gallery, a museum and incredible views. On a clear day, four active volcanos can be seen from Anchor Point – Redoubt, Iliamna, Augustine and Douglas.  

The Anchor River begins attracting king salmon anglers the weekend before Memorial Day and then offers more excitement through the summer and fall with fisheries of Dolly Varden, silver salmon and steelhead trout. May to September, local sports fishing charter operators utilize a tractor launch on the beach to put clients on Cook Inlet’s big halibut, salmon and other sport fish.

 

 

Anchor Point is more than just incredible fishing, though. The area also offers birding, hiking, wildlife viewing and photography. Guided excursions available in the area include bear viewing, marine tours, kayaking, flightseeing, dog sledding and ecotourism. The Anchor Point beach is a popular spot to see and film bald eagles and shorebirds.

To reach the most westerly highway point, follow Anchor River Road (Beach Road) from town to its end, where you’ll find a viewing deck and telescopes overlooking Cook Inlet and a sign designating this special point.

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Information from Travel Alaska

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Live Alaska Retirement

There are many reasons to head North to Alaska for the Golden Years. Whether you love adventure, or seek peace and quiet, Alaska has so much to offer. Rich in art, fresh local dining, hunting, fishing, skiing, snowshoeing, and wildlife, Alaska also has a solid sense of community. Retirees often miss the days where neighbors lend each other a hand, and in Alaska, that is still very much alive. The people are gracious and friendly and love where they live.

MW-AW174 RHNT H 20121110221958 MG     When most retirees think “beach,” they’re imagining places like the sugar-sand coastlines of Florida or the towering cliffs along California’s Pacific coast. But one of the most breathtaking beaches in America—the Homer Spit, a four-mile stretch of rocky land jutting out into the turquoise Kachemak Bay—is located in Homer, Alaska.  The small town of Homer sports not only that strand of beach, but also views of the glaciated, rugged Kenai Mountains and a plethora of wildlife (it’s well-known for its bear viewing, but you’re also apt to spot moose, whales, puffins, otters and foxes).Homer is also the headquarters for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge—a 3.4 million acre sanctuary established to save marine mammals, seabirds and other migratory birds—and the town and surrounding areas boast more than 90 miles of managed hiking trails running near the coastline. 

The town itself is artsy, dotted with family-owned shops offering local Alaskan handmade crafts, clothing, art and toys.  “There’s a freedom of spirit and a lot of natural beauty here,” says Monte Davis, the executive director for the Homer Convention & Visitor’s Center. Plus, “Homer is a small Alaska fishing village … that’s four hours to the big city, Anchorage.”  The restaurants here (there are 15 on the Homer Spit alone, and many more on Pioneer Avenue, Sterling Highway and Main Street) pride themselves on serving local foods: Freshly caught salmon or halibut are common, as are oysters harvested from the far side of Kachemak Bay.  Residents have a bit of an independent frontier spirit but are certainly willing to chip in and help a neighbor; there are over 100 nonprofits in town.

When most retirees think “beach,” they’re imagining places like the sugar-sand coastlines of Florida or the towering cliffs along California’s Pacific coast. But one of the most breathtaking beaches in America—the Homer Spit, a four-mile stretch of rocky land jutting out into the turquoise Kachemak Bay—is located in Homer, Alaska.  The small town of Homer sports not only that strand of beach, but also views of the glaciated, rugged Kenai Mountains and a plethora of wildlife (it’s well-known for its bear viewing, but you’re also apt to spot moose, whales, puffins, otters and foxes).Homer is also the headquarters for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge—a 3.4 million acre sanctuary established to save marine mammals, seabirds and other migratory birds—and the town and surrounding areas boast more than 90 miles of managed hiking trails running near the coastline.

The town itself is artsy, dotted with family-owned shops offering local Alaskan handmade crafts, clothing, art and toys.  “There’s a freedom of spirit and a lot of natural beauty here,” says Monte Davis, the executive director for the Homer Convention & Visitor’s Center. Plus, “Homer is a small Alaska fishing village … that’s four hours to the big city, Anchorage.”  The restaurants here (there are 15 on the Homer Spit alone, and many more on Pioneer Avenue, Sterling Highway and Main Street) pride themselves on serving local foods: Freshly caught salmon or halibut are common, as are oysters harvested from the far side of Kachemak Bay.  Residents have a bit of an independent frontier spirit but are certainly willing to chip in and help a neighbor; there are over 100 nonprofits in town.

Other pluses of Homer for retirees are a hospital and small airport, Homer’s (relatively) mild temperatures (the average high in January is 29.2 degrees Fahrenheit, and the average high in July is 60.9 degrees) and a somewhat forgiving property tax climate.  Although property taxes average $1,130 for every $100,000 in assessed value, people over 65 get an exemption on $150,000 in valuation from the city of Homer and on the first $300,000 in valuation from the Kenai Peninsula Borough. However, though the state levies no sales tax, the city and borough together levy a sales tax that totals 7.5%.
 

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    By the numbers*:
  • Population: 5,003
  • Median home cost: $221,000
  • Cost of living: 33.2% higher than U.S. average
  • Unemployment: 8.9%
**Excerpts from an article by Catey Hill

Financial security is always a consideration, and Alaska is one of the top ranked states rated for overall financial security for future retirees. Read more at "Here's why it might be a good idea to retire in Alaska" from PBS 2014.

 

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Mary Trimble - Broker/Owner

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Since 1975, Mary and Emmitt Trimble have been actively involved in Real Estate. They have raised their two daughters, Allison and Lauren, and are a wealth of knowlege about how to Live Alaska!
 
The "Last Frontier" has provided well for Mary, her family, and her clients in terms of lifestyle, and financial opportunity. Fishing, hunting, snow machining, hiking, clamming, four wheeling, flying and respecting the land water, and air that provide those opportunities, is at the heart of the Trimble family. Mary is an active member of the community, and enjoys the culture and activities that make Homer and Anchor Point so special.
 
Mary offers experienced assistance to clients from around the world who appreciate the beauty and wonder of Alaska.
 
Visit and view Mary's properties at Trimble Properties!
 

 

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